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Inclined Bed Therapy

Inclined Bed Therapy (IBT)

Sleeping Inclined To Restore and Support Your Health For Free. Fascinating Science, Discovery, History and Medical Research In Circulation And Posture, by Andrew K Fletcher

 

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    • Eye irrigation removes cataracts safely using deionised / distilled water
    • Hi Andrew, How interesting! I have only in the last week been diagnosed with cataracts (I am 59) which I have been told are minor and described as 5%. I personally think that my worsening distance vision and now cataracts haven't been helped by having Intensive Hyperbaric Oxygen treatment recently, I believe that eyesight can take a while to settle, from weeks to months in fact so I intend to check my prescription once more in 6 months. The reason for telling you this is that after too long a gap because of certain life events, not least of which was my husband being diagnosed with Lymphoma which he is now thankfully in remission from, I am now returning to IBT. I began with IBT roughly 6 years ago and submitted a tracking report to you at the time (I have MS) I was wondering about this thread, if you are meaning that IBT alongside the ionised water is making the difference with cataracts or just the eye washing alone? Can't promise to manage 4 eye washes a day, although we have bought the ionised water today in readiness and willing to try at least once a day! What we WILL be doing is sleeping inclined again starting last week and I would be more than willing to let you know in 6 months if there has been a change in my cataracts percentage wise if it might be helpful? Hope I manage to post this as I’m a bit of a technophobe! Thanking you for all the care and attention you give in getting your message across re IBT. Best wishes Elaine.
    • In IBT Forum / General discussion
    • Author Elaine
    • 2 days 2 hours ago

NewScientist

King's Reach Tower, Stamford Street, London SE1 9LS 

Switchboard: 071 261 5000 Fax: 071 261 6464

Andrew Fletcher 26 Berry Drive Paignton Devon TQ3 3QW

18 April 1995

Dear Andrew,

First let me apologise for having taken so long to write to you about your ideas on how solute concentration gradients could drive fluid flow. Working on special projects, as we have been for the past few weeks, often makes it difficult for us to deal with other suggestions as quickly as we would like to.

In this case, the delay is especially unfortunate as, having now had time to think about your ideas in the light of the comments by Dr Cutler, I'm not persuaded they have a strong claim on our space at this stage. Let me explain why.

As I see it, your core idea is that scientists have overlooked one of the most important mechanisms driving fluid flow in trees and plants—namely, the effect that concentrated phloem solutions at the tops of plants have on more dilute fluids at the roots (the downward force of one causing the other to be sucked up). The problem for us is that the picture cannot really be this simple. As Dr Cutler points out, sap in phloem tends to move in the direction of demand, laterally as well as vertically: what happens to the fluid flow system when the concentrated solutions are all in the bottom half of the tree? If the downward force of the "heavy" solution was the main thing then presumably the tree would be in trouble.

But we know trees don't (normally) run into this kind of trouble, which suggests that even if there is a contribution to fluid flow from the phenomenon you describe, it must be less important than capillary action and other forms of root pressure.

As to the wider implications of the phenomenon, I'm afraid we cannot see a strong case for giving them publicity in the absence of good correlative evidence, though we appreciate that your intention at this stage is merely to air them in a speculative fashion.

I'm sorry we can't be more positive, particularly in light of the delay. I am returning the copy of the video and tape.

Best wishes,


David Concar

Life Sciences Editor

Registered Office: IPC Magazines Ltd., King's Reach Tower, Stamford Street, London SE1 9LS Registered Number: 53626 England -Qi^- member of the Reed Elsevier pic group

 

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