How do I adapt my bed?


Plastic bed risers are inexpensive and measuring 6 Inches or 15 cm's can be used under the bed frame with ease. These usually are supplied in 4's
This gives us two for the bed at home and due to them fitting inside of each other, they pack neatly into a suitcase for those days we are away from home.

Use blocks as shown in the picture on the main forum page for a box divan type bed.



If the bed joins in the middle, then you will need 6 inch / 15 cm blocks at the head end and 3 inch / 7.5 cm blocks in the middle and take off the castors at the bootm to provide the correct angle.

A simple and tidy way to modify a bed is to get a length of strong grey soil pipe from a builders merchant. Cut to correct lengths so Top of bed would be 7.5 inches middle of bed 3.25 inches and bottom of the bed 1.5 inches these fit over the castors of the bed and provide a better looking modification than the blocks. One length of pipe will do several beds and they are pretty cheap too, especially if you find one in the recycle centre that has not been used. The casters are then inserted into the pipe lengths.

A Plywood board 1/2 / 13 mm or thicker, cut to size of mattress, placed under the mattress with 6 inch timber across the bed frame at the top, 3 inch in the middle and some anti slip fabric (type used to prevent mats and carpets from slipping, placed between the board and the mattress.
This method should be used with pine beds and bunk beds, where the frames are too weak to take the stress of being inclined.


For hospital type beds, a length of 3/4 inch plywood cut to size of mattress, placed under the mattress will allow the mechanical mechanism to tilt the whole bed when the head end is raised.

A foam wedge can be cut to the length of the bed and placed under the mattress. This method is not favoured due to the compressibility of the foam.

A wedge can be made from folded blankets placed under the mattress.

Bed legs can be removed or sawn off to give the correct angle.

The frame can be altered moving the metal joinery up or down the frame.

Please support Andrew's research

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